Fibre broadband – it’s a win-win for landlords and tenants

As more online entertainment services like the recent launch of Vodafone TV come on to the market, it’s not surprising that the number of people using fibre broadband nearly doubled in the past year* as they seek a better online experience to watch their favourite movies and TV shows.

If you’re renting a property, the benefits of getting fibre are obvious but if you’re a landlord, you might be wondering if it’s worth getting fibre installed. Absolutely. We might be biased here at Chorus, but real estate agents agree – not only will fibre increase the value of your property, it’s a drawcard for attracting future tenants.

Because fibre requires new equipment to be installed inside and outside the property, it’s important for both tenants and landlords to know what’s involved so you can avoid any roadblocks along the way. Check out the steps below with a couple of tips from us to get you started.

Tenants

  • If you want fibre broadband, you’ll need to get the ok from your landlord first. Have a chat with them or your property manager and agree that you’re both happy to get fibre installed. The great thing about fibre is that, in many instances, it’s currently free to get installed** so neither of you will be out of pocket.
  • When your landlord has given the ok, you can contact your chosen broadband provider to order fibre. There are some great value plans around with entry level fibre broadband plans starting at around $60 per month. Sites like Glimp and Broadband Compare are helpful tools for comparing current plans on offer.
  • Once you’ve placed your order, we’ll be in touch to arrange a time for a technician to visit your home to assess the work that needs to be done. An installation plan will be drawn up, which you’ll need to sign before any work begins. If your landlord wants to be part of the discussion they’ll need to arrange to be there when the technician visits.
  • If your property is an apartment, unit or shares a driveway with other houses, we need to notify your neighbours before getting started on build work to connect fibre to your house. Find out more here.

Landlords

  • If your tenants want fibre broadband to be installed, they’ll need your permission first. The great thing about fibre is that, in many instances, it’s currently free to get installed** so there shouldn’t be any cost to you.
  • When your tenant orders fibre with their broadband provider, we’ll contact them to organise a time for a technician to visit your property and assess the work that needs to be done. An installation plan will be drawn up, which your tenants will sign off on before work begins. If you’re happy for your tenant to approve the install plan on your behalf then you won’t need to be at the appointment. If you’d like to be part of the discussion, you’ll need to let your tenants know and arrange to be there when the technician visits.
  • If your property is an apartment, unit or shares a driveway with other houses, we need to notify your neighbours before getting started on build work to connect fibre to your house. The work we do will fall into one of three categories depending on the impact it has on the surrounding property. Find out more here.

If you want a reliable and fast broadband connection that’s built to last, you can’t go past fibre. Not sure if fibre is available in your street, or want to know when it’s coming? Simply enter your address in our broadband checker to find out.

* The number of people connected to fibre broadband in June 2017 was up 67% on the same time last year – Statistics New Zealand.

**Chorus currently offers standard residential fibre installations for free (usually via existing infrastructure i.e. on a like-for-like basis) in areas that have fibre in the street. Charges may apply when you choose alternative installation, e.g. underground when aerial is available. Some broadband providers may charge a fee for installation of their equipment, so check when placing an order.

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